Amazon Launches Truity, a New Private Label “Professional Yoga” Brand

As Amazon continues its private label expansion in 2019, it has quietly launched a new private label athletic apparel brand called Truity, we believe.

Amazon has not made any official announcements about the brand yet, but ten Truity-brand items are now listed for sale on Amazon and labeled as “Our Brand.” Some of the items just launched have Vine reviews dated in mid-January. Amazon has also applied for a trademark on “Truity” in clothing.

Amazon is positioning the brand as “a professional yoga brand that focuses on sports equipment and yoga pants for over 10 years.” We’re a little unsure about the “for over 10 years” part, but one Truity product page shows an image of gear with a “Zoano” logo on it. The Zoano brand appears to be made by Xiamen, China-based Zuona Sports Co Ltd, which features yoga and athletic gear on its website. So perhaps Zuona Sports is creating a product line for Amazon’s Truity brand based on some of its Zoano gear? We can’t be sure, but that appears to possibly be the case.

Truity is not Amazon’s first yoga gear label. Amazon has launched yoga pants and athletic apparel under a number of its other private label brands, including Core 10, Mint Lilac, 7Goals, and others. Truity items appear to be comparably priced to other Amazon private label yoga apparel, if not slightly less, and generally much less than other yoga brands like Lululemon, Athleta, Zella, Zobha, Gaiam, Nike, Under Armour, and others.

We’ve added Truity to the TJI Amazon Brand Database. To track Amazon’s efforts on an ongoing basis, subscribe to the TJI Briefing.

10 Amazon Exclusive “Our” Brands Added to TJI Amazon Brand Database

We’ve added 17 Amazon Exclusive “Our” brands to the TJI Amazon Brand Database. The new brands we’re seeing are across grocery, apparel, and B2B.

The new brands are:

  1. Awesome 360 – socks
  2. Brand Q – quinoa
  3. Cyanstyle – women’s clothing
  4. Daily Boost Coffee Company – coffee
  5. Here To There Packaging – cardboard boxes
  6. In Leather We Trust – leather jackets
  7. JustAddMix – drink mixes
  8. KISSMEE FOR LADIES – women’s dresses and jumpsuits
  9. Tresori – women’s bags
  10. Ultracraft – tools

For more information, see theTJI Amazon Brand Database or Subscribe to the TJI Briefing.

Amazon Expanding Selection of Private Label Baby Products

Just as Amazon is expanding its private label health and personal care products lineup as part of its overall efforts to expand its private label selection, Amazon is also expanding its assortment of baby products across brands, we are seeing.

The new products are launching under Amazon’s Mama Bear, Solimo, Amazon Elements, Amazon Essentials, Silly Apples, and Moon and Back brands. Here are a few examples of products we are seeing:

We are also seeing many new baby apparel items under Amazon’s Silly Apples and Moon and Back brands.

Amazon now sells “Our Brand” items under 135 private label brands and over 330 Amazon Exclusive brands. For more on Amazon’s private label efforts, subscribe to TJI Briefing and check out the TJI Amazon Brand Database.

Amazon Launches 5-Blade “MotionSphere” Razor, Many More Health & Personal Care Products Under Its Solimo Private Label Brand

Continuing its expansion into private label health and personal care products, Amazon has launched several new items under its Solimo brand in recent days and weeks.

Of note is a new Solimo 5-Blade MotionSphere Razor for Men, which sells with two cartridges for $7.49. It launched with several Vine reviews. Of course, Amazon is selling replacement blades as well, at 8 for $15.99. Those price points are generally lower than high-end 5-blade razors from Gillete, Schick, Bic, and others.

In addition, Amazon has launched a barrage of new Solimo private label health and personal care products, including:

These will compete with similar products from national brand owners including Johnson & Johnson, Proctor & Gamble, Neutrogena, Olay, Dove, Nivea, Chattem, & more.

Solimo is one of Amazon’s fastest growing private label brands, both in the US and around the world. It has added dozens of products over the last couple of months across a variety of product categories.

Amazon now sells “Our Brand” items under 135 private label brands and over 330 Amazon Exclusive brands. For more on Amazon’s private label efforts, subscribe to TJI Briefing and check out the TJI Amazon Brand Database.

Amazon Launches New Line of “Big & Tall” Amazon Essentials Brand Apparel Designed by DXL

Amazon Essentials has been one of Amazon’s fastest growing private label brands in recent months in terms of product count. The number of Amazon Essentials apparel items for sale on Amazon in the US has doubled from under 200 products at the end of September to over 400 at the end of December by our count, with new items ranging from casual shirts to jeans, leggings, and hoodies.

Now, Amazon is expanding its Amazon Essentials assortment further with a new line of “big & tall” apparel items designed by speciality retailer DXL, we are seeing. The new line, called Amazon Essentials Fit by DXL, is now live on Amazon.com within the Amazon Essentials private label brand’s apparel section. Sizes for “designed by DXL” items start at 2XL.

We’re seeing 38 items, ranging from shirts to pants, underwear, and hoodies. Each item says, “With fits designed by DXL, Amazon Essentials offers menswear built for your proportions.”

These are the only DXL items currently on Amazon – currently, the DXL storefront on Amazon is empty. We’ll keep an eye on the new product line to see how it evolves over time.

Update: The move is part of DXL’s launch of a wholesale business unit “focused on product development and distribution relationships with key retailers. As a result of this new model, the Company intends to develop and distribute both private label and co-branded men’s big and tall apparel lines,” DXL announced. “As part of this initiative, the Company is pleased to announce that it has been selected as the provider of men’s big and tall sizes for the Amazon Private Brand, Amazon Essentials, which is now available.”

Amazon: Private Label Products Represent <1% of Sales, Excluding Whole Foods

Last week, Axios’ David McCabe did a story on some of the regulatory efforts looking at Amazon’s private label initiatives. Apparently in response to that post, Axios says Amazon issued it the following statement:

“Amazon’s private label products are less than 1% of our total sales. This is far less than other retailers, many of whom have private label products that represent 25% or more of their sales,” the spokesperson said in an additional statement after this story was published. The company added that private-label products accounted for a greater percentage of sales at retailers like Costco, Walmart and Kroger, as well as major European brands, than they do at Amazon. (The “less than 1%” figure does not include sales at the Amazon-owned Whole Foods grocery chain.)

Depending on how you want to guesstimate total private label sales (Amazon reported $177 billion in total sales in 2017, including about $6 billion from its physical stores), that would put the number below about $1.7 billion for 2017. That is a good bit lower than estimates we have seen from various analysts. Amazon will report its year-end 2018 results in a few weeks, which should include full-year numbers for physical stores.

By comparison, CNN’s Nathaniel Meyersohn recently pointed out that Costco’s Kirkland Signature private label brand generated nearly $40 billion of revenues in 2017. Costco reported about $126 billion in sales for FY 2017, which would put Kirkland at about 30% of sales.

So, it seems like there may be some room for growth for Amazon’s private label efforts.

EU regulators have been looking at Amazon’s marketplace efforts in greater depth recently. In addition, Indian regulators recently passed new rules that go into effect February 1 which apparently limit marketplaces from selling products they have an ownership interest in, amongst other new restrictions.

Amazon Launches Wag Brand Private Label Cat Food

Amazon continues to expand its private label pet food assortment. It has just launched Wag wet cat food in a variety of flavors. This is the first time Amazon has launched private label cat foods that we have seen.

The launch is the latest in a string of private label pet product launches from Amazon over the last year. After launching its Wag brand of private label dog food earlier last year, Amazon then launched Solimo brand dog food in September. Amazon has positioned its Solimo dog food at a lower price point, despite positioning it as “premium.”

A number of Amazon Exclusive “Our Brand” pet products brands have also launched in recent months, including Direct Protect Plus (pet shampoo), Dogg Cookie (pet treats), Kruz Pet (pet accessories), Olaganics (pet food supplements), Pet Craft Supply Co. (pet toys and apparel), Simply Perfection (premium pet food), Sterling (pet accessories), and Zoeez Naturals (pet food supplements).

In November, Amazon also launched Lifelong Complete, a new private label pet brand it is marketing in Europe. We haven’t seen Amazon market the Lifelong Complete brand in the US or Asia yet.

The US pet food market was estimated to be about $29 billion in 2017, according to the American Pet Products Association. PetSmart acquired Chewy.com last year for $3.35 billion in the largest e-commerce acquisition ever. Amazon likely sees a need and an opportunity here to build preference for its private label and exclusive brands and drive long term loyalty.

Pet food also represents an opportunity for Amazon to grow its advertising revenues. Amazon’s Pet Supplies hub page now features a mix of Amazon private label, Amazon exclusive, and third party brands. Brands paying for sponsored listings with the Pet Supplies hub include Hill’s Science Diet, IAMS, Purina ONE, Fancy Feast, Rachel Ray, and others.

The TJI Amazon Brand Report – January 2019 Edition

TJI Amazon Brand Database – The Independent Global List of Amazon Private Label and Exclusive Brands

As one of the largest internet retailers and e-commerce platforms in a growing number of markets around the world, Amazon holds a unique position in an increasing number of retail product categories. Over the last decade, Amazon has introduced a number of private label and exclusive brands, and recently it has accelerated its efforts by bringing to market both many new brands and an increasing number of products offered under them.

But, while Amazon labels these brands in different ways in different places, there’s no singular comprehensive reference for manufacturers, brand owners, or retailers to find all of Amazon’s private label and exclusive brands in one place. That’s why we have created the TJI Amazon Brand Database — the independent global list of Amazon private label and exclusive brands.

      

450+ Private Label and Exclusive Brands

In the fourth quarter of 2018, Amazon introduced 7 new private label brands and over 150 new exclusive “Our Brands,” bringing the total number of Amazon brands we are tracking to over 450.

Some brands, like Solimo, are in use by Amazon globally. Others, like Alkove (one of Amazon’s furniture brands in the UK/EU) or Silly Apples (one of Amazon’s children’s clothing brands in the US) are only in use in one of Amazon’s country stores.

All told, we’ve identified 135 Amazon private label brands and 330+ Amazon exclusive brands from Amazon’s retail sites around the world as of today, for a total of 450+ private label and exclusive brands combined. That represents a much larger number than has previously been identified in any reports we’ve seen.

As a few examples, some Amazon private label brands that you may not have seen before include Movian, Alkove, Ravenna Home, Lifelong Complete, Revly, Eono Essentials, Filgate, Leather Architect, The Casual Grey, and Hem & Seam.

And the number is growing.

From Car Care to Cheese, Increasing Product Category Coverage

While Amazon’s brand portfolio is largest in clothing — there are over 180 private label and exclusive clothing, shoes, accessories brands in the US alone — Amazon brands run the gamut of consumer product categories.

For example, we count over 40 food and grocery brands, 60 healthcare and beauty brands, and 20 household goods brands in the US alone. From Solimo razors to AmazonBasics cat hotels, from Rivet mattresses to Happy Belly cookies, Amazon’s thousands of private label and exclusive brand items cover a greater number of retail categories than you may think.

A Growing Global Footprint

While the greatest number of Amazon private label brands are marketed in the US, Amazon has made efforts to build its brand portfolio around the world as well.

For example, in the UK and EU, Amazon has many private label clothing brands that don’t exist in other Amazon markets. And in India, Amazon has a spectrum of private label and exclusive clothing brands ranging from the traditional to the modern.

Dive In

We continue to find new brands on an ongoing basis, and we predict the number of brands is only going to grow.

The TJI Amazon Brand Database is a starting point for researchers and analysts to navigate the breadth and depth of Amazon’s private label and exclusive brands.

For professionals interested in tracking Amazon’s private brand efforts on an ongoing basis, subscribe to TJI Briefing, which covers the latest developments across Amazon’s brand portfolio.

17 Amazon Exclusive Brands Added to TJI Amazon Brand Database

We’ve added 17 Amazon Exclusive brands to the TJI Amazon Brand Database.

It’s the first time we’ve seen brands in the small appliance market. We’re also seeing several new furniture brands, and gaming accessories. All worth keeping an eye on.

The new brands are:

  1. Alpha Mats – exercise mats
  2. Brampton – outdoor furniture
  3. HomeVolts – small appliances
  4. Hunter’s Tail – sporting goods
  5. iMW – gaming accessories
  6. JC Home – furniture
  7. Kruz Pet – pet accessories
  8. Luby – small appliances
  9. LyricLyfe – music themed clothing
  10. Pioneer Square – furniture
  11. Pomona Organic – juices
  12. Rainier – gas appliances
  13. Red Hook – furniture
  14. Rockpoint – furniture
  15. Sunday Oasis – women’s activewear
  16. Taylor + Logan – modern furniture
  17. Tenten – smart plugs

For more information, see theTJI Amazon Brand Database or Subscribe to the TJI Briefing.

Amazon Building New Perishable Meal Platform for “Time-Starved Customers”

Speculation has been growing about Amazon’s recent grocery efforts. On the one hand, Amazon has built out its first few Amazon Go automated food stores in urban centers and is likely to roll the concept out much more broadly. On the other hand, Amazon has been leveraging its Whole Foods Markets real estate as mini Prime Now food distribution centers, and could build out more Whole Foods stores to be able to broaden its geographic reach and shorten delivery times in more cities and suburban areas.

But what will Amazon’s product strategy be?

An important part of what Amazon is currently thinking appears to be ready-made meals. According to a recent Amazon job posting (which has been taken down), Amazon is planning to build a “new perishable food platform” to deliver “world class meal solutions for time-starved customers.” The listing reads:

Are you interested in changing how customers solve the “what’s for dinner?” dilemma? If yes, Amazon is looking for somebody with your enthusiasm and skills to build and lead the team that delivers world class meal solutions for time-starved customers. We are looking for an entrepreneurial, analytical, operationally-minded category leader to deliver a new perishable food platform. This role will require the ability to set a vision and drive the end-to-end strategy that will fuel the growth and long term profitability of this critical assortment. The right person for this role will have deep experience developing and commercializing a portfolio of perishable packaged foods, communicating effectively to stakeholders and closely with the cross-functional teams as well as owning the P&L.

Ready-made meals is an interesting strategy because it leverages two major competitive advantages Amazon has been investing in heavily: 1) its Prime Now network of last mile delivery solutions, and 2) its growing network of Amazon Go and Whole Foods food distribution centers, er, grocery stores. Ready meals are a logical application to run on top of this infrastructure.

By focusing on ready meals, Amazon is apparently choosing a different strategy than the “mail-order ingredients you prepare yourself” meal kit companies like Blue Apron, Hello Fresh, Plated, and many more. Instead, Amazon is focusing on the “time-starved” segment of the population. We think that makes sense. (Note, however, that Amazon does offer its own selection of non-perishable meal kits, but they appear to be sparsely reviewed. There is also a single perishable meal from Tyson available via AmazonFresh in our spot check.) Amazon does also offer perishable foods at Whole Foods and Amazon Go currently.

By ramping up its ready meal efforts, Amazon will also be competing more broadly with restaurants that offer takeout or delivery, and the logistics networks like Uber Eats that are virtualizing them. (Amazon is also building its own food delivery service, Amazon Restaurants, that is available in about 20 cities.) Just as Amazon has built out its own portfolio of private label brands across multiple retail categories, including non-perishable food, we could see Amazon creating its own “restaurant-like” private label brands for different types of ready meals (pizza, Thai, etc).

Given the investments Amazon has made in grocery and logistics thus far, we expect perishable meals and related new food products to be an area that Amazon is prepared to invest in and grind it out over a period of time.