10 Amazon Exclusive “Our” Brands Added to TJI Amazon Brand Database

We’ve added 17 Amazon Exclusive “Our” brands to the TJI Amazon Brand Database. The new brands we’re seeing are across grocery, apparel, and B2B.

The new brands are:

  1. Awesome 360 – socks
  2. Brand Q – quinoa
  3. Cyanstyle – women’s clothing
  4. Daily Boost Coffee Company – coffee
  5. Here To There Packaging – cardboard boxes
  6. In Leather We Trust – leather jackets
  7. JustAddMix – drink mixes
  8. KISSMEE FOR LADIES – women’s dresses and jumpsuits
  9. Tresori – women’s bags
  10. Ultracraft – tools

For more information, see theTJI Amazon Brand Database or Subscribe to the TJI Briefing.

TJI Amazon Briefing for January 17, 2019

Good afternoon! Today’s TJI Amazon Briefing covers the latest on Amazon’s latest home decor ML tools, health and personal care private label products, increasing private label baby selection, re:MARS, AWS Backup, Alexa’s new voice, Virginia lawmaker donations, and new grocery stats.

Leading professionals rely on TJI. A TJI Briefing subscription is only USD $149/month, or $995/year, for an individual subscriber.
We deliver the information and insights that executives and analysts need to understand what Amazon is doing and where it is going. Subscribe or Learn More

Amazon Expanding Selection of Private Label Baby Products

Just as Amazon is expanding its private label health and personal care products lineup as part of its overall efforts to expand its private label selection, Amazon is also expanding its assortment of baby products across brands, we are seeing.

The new products are launching under Amazon’s Mama Bear, Solimo, Amazon Elements, Amazon Essentials, Silly Apples, and Moon and Back brands. Here are a few examples of products we are seeing:

We are also seeing many new baby apparel items under Amazon’s Silly Apples and Moon and Back brands.

Amazon now sells “Our Brand” items under 135 private label brands and over 330 Amazon Exclusive brands. For more on Amazon’s private label efforts, subscribe to TJI Briefing and check out the TJI Amazon Brand Database.

Amazon Launches 5-Blade “MotionSphere” Razor, Many More Health & Personal Care Products Under Its Solimo Private Label Brand

Continuing its expansion into private label health and personal care products, Amazon has launched several new items under its Solimo brand in recent days and weeks.

Of note is a new Solimo 5-Blade MotionSphere Razor for Men, which sells with two cartridges for $7.49. It launched with several Vine reviews. Of course, Amazon is selling replacement blades as well, at 8 for $15.99. Those price points are generally lower than high-end 5-blade razors from Gillete, Schick, Bic, and others.

In addition, Amazon has launched a barrage of new Solimo private label health and personal care products, including:

These will compete with similar products from national brand owners including Johnson & Johnson, Proctor & Gamble, Neutrogena, Olay, Dove, Nivea, Chattem, & more.

Solimo is one of Amazon’s fastest growing private label brands, both in the US and around the world. It has added dozens of products over the last couple of months across a variety of product categories.

Amazon now sells “Our Brand” items under 135 private label brands and over 330 Amazon Exclusive brands. For more on Amazon’s private label efforts, subscribe to TJI Briefing and check out the TJI Amazon Brand Database.

Amazon Launches “Home Style Quiz,” Another New ML-Based Home Decor Recommendations Tool

Back in September, Amazon launched Scout, its tool for recommending furniture and home decor items. It works by prompting users for “thumbs up” or “thumbs down” ratings of selected items and then, Amazon says, by using machine learning algorithms to make recommendations based on thousands of visual attributes.

Then, two weeks ago, we found that Amazon had integrated a Scout-like recommendations module on furniture product pages that works in a similar way.

Now, we are seeing a third product variant of the Scout tool, called the Home Style Quiz. It’s a 6-step quiz that results in furniture and home decor product recommendations, and is now live on Amazon.com in the US. Here’s how it looks:

Step 1. Amazon gives users 15 pictures of fully decorated rooms, and asks, “Which three looks are your favorites?”

Steps 2, 3, and 4. Amazon chooses items based on the user’s input in the previous step, and prompts users to “Vote on at least three pieces to help us narrow down your unique style.” A total of 20 items are presented in each of these three steps.

Step 5. Amazon asks users to express preferences on colors. Amazon asks, “Let’s talk color–how much is just right?” Users can choose between three options: “Keep it neutral,” “Some pops of color,” or “The bolder the better.”

Step 6. Finally, users are asked, “Lastly, how much pattern and texture are perfect?” Available answers are: “None, thanks,” “Less is more,” and “Can’t get enough.”

The ensuing results page offers suggested products grouped into three categories. In our example, the results were: “Your unique blend of styles is Industrial, California Casual, and Glam.” A section for each of those categories is listed below, offering recommended products in each section. Here’s what the “Industrial” section looks like in our example.

Finally, there are “Color & Pattern Recommendations” and “Products You Liked” sections.

Big picture, Amazon is continuing to experiment with new ways of exposing users to machine learning services to improve its personalization and recommendation algorithms. The Scout concept makes sense for highly visual product categories like furniture and home decor. We believe more intelligent personalization is an area in which Amazon can improve significantly through further R&D.

Amazon has chosen not to invest heavily in human recommendations much, a la how StitchFix manually curates for apparel. However, Amazon has created a little-known tool called Outfit Compare, in which customers can upload photos of themselves and get an Amazon staffer’s opinion of which looks better.

TJI Amazon Briefing for January 15, 2019

Good morning! Today’s TJI Amazon Briefing covers the latest on Amazon’s Whole Foods 365 plans, German legal issues for Dash, Amazon India promotions in advance of February 1, Amazon and DXL’s new product launch, another AWS acquisition, Kroger CEO comments, and more.

Leading professionals rely on TJI. A TJI Briefing subscription is only USD $149/month, or $995/year, for an individual subscriber.
We deliver the information and insights that executives and analysts need to understand what Amazon is doing and where it is going. Subscribe or Learn More

Amazon Launches New Line of “Big & Tall” Amazon Essentials Brand Apparel Designed by DXL

Amazon Essentials has been one of Amazon’s fastest growing private label brands in recent months in terms of product count. The number of Amazon Essentials apparel items for sale on Amazon in the US has doubled from under 200 products at the end of September to over 400 at the end of December by our count, with new items ranging from casual shirts to jeans, leggings, and hoodies.

Now, Amazon is expanding its Amazon Essentials assortment further with a new line of “big & tall” apparel items designed by speciality retailer DXL, we are seeing. The new line, called Amazon Essentials Fit by DXL, is now live on Amazon.com within the Amazon Essentials private label brand’s apparel section. Sizes for “designed by DXL” items start at 2XL.

We’re seeing 38 items, ranging from shirts to pants, underwear, and hoodies. Each item says, “With fits designed by DXL, Amazon Essentials offers menswear built for your proportions.”

These are the only DXL items currently on Amazon – currently, the DXL storefront on Amazon is empty. We’ll keep an eye on the new product line to see how it evolves over time.

Update: The move is part of DXL’s launch of a wholesale business unit “focused on product development and distribution relationships with key retailers. As a result of this new model, the Company intends to develop and distribute both private label and co-branded men’s big and tall apparel lines,” DXL announced. “As part of this initiative, the Company is pleased to announce that it has been selected as the provider of men’s big and tall sizes for the Amazon Private Brand, Amazon Essentials, which is now available.”

Amazon: Private Label Products Represent <1% of Sales, Excluding Whole Foods

Last week, Axios’ David McCabe did a story on some of the regulatory efforts looking at Amazon’s private label initiatives. Apparently in response to that post, Axios says Amazon issued it the following statement:

“Amazon’s private label products are less than 1% of our total sales. This is far less than other retailers, many of whom have private label products that represent 25% or more of their sales,” the spokesperson said in an additional statement after this story was published. The company added that private-label products accounted for a greater percentage of sales at retailers like Costco, Walmart and Kroger, as well as major European brands, than they do at Amazon. (The “less than 1%” figure does not include sales at the Amazon-owned Whole Foods grocery chain.)

Depending on how you want to guesstimate total private label sales (Amazon reported $177 billion in total sales in 2017, including about $6 billion from its physical stores), that would put the number below about $1.7 billion for 2017. That is a good bit lower than estimates we have seen from various analysts. Amazon will report its year-end 2018 results in a few weeks, which should include full-year numbers for physical stores.

By comparison, CNN’s Nathaniel Meyersohn recently pointed out that Costco’s Kirkland Signature private label brand generated nearly $40 billion of revenues in 2017. Costco reported about $126 billion in sales for FY 2017, which would put Kirkland at about 30% of sales.

So, it seems like there may be some room for growth for Amazon’s private label efforts.

EU regulators have been looking at Amazon’s marketplace efforts in greater depth recently. In addition, Indian regulators recently passed new rules that go into effect February 1 which apparently limit marketplaces from selling products they have an ownership interest in, amongst other new restrictions.